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U.S. Department of Labor

Agency Overview

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Through its technical cooperation programming, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) helps to combat the worst forms of child labor, including forced labor and human trafficking, and helps ensure that trade partners fulfill their labor-related trade commitments to level the playing field for U.S. workers so they are not forced to compete with child laborers and other vulnerable workers. It does this by working with governments and key stakeholders to improve institutional and systematic labor law enforcement, prohibit the use of child labor and forced labor, and support improved education and livelihoods for vulnerable populations.

ILAB implements technical cooperation projects under two broad programs.

ILAB’s Child Labor and Forced Labor program supports efforts to combat exploitative child labor and forced labor around the world. Technical cooperation projects range from targeted action programs in specific sectors of work to more comprehensive programs that support national efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor as defined by International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention 182.

ILAB’s Trade and Labor Affairs programming provides technical assistance that supports identified efforts by trade partner countries to enforce and comply with their labor-related trade commitments. Project goals include adopting or reforming labor laws or standards, improving labor inspectorates' enforcement processes and capacity, supporting U.S. businesses in mitigating labor-related risks in global supply chains, and improving adherence to occupational safety and health standards.

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U.S. Department of Labor Data

U.S. government agencies report data quarterly to ForeignAssistance.gov to comply with the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2016 (FATAA). Each agency is required by FATAA to report data for FY2015 as the minimum base year, although some agencies have reported data prior to FY2015. Agency reporting completeness for FY2015 onward is captured below.

View our Agency Notes for additional information
Data Last Updated: 8/28/2020

Requested Funding By Fiscal Year | DOL

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Appropriated Funding By Fiscal Year | DOL

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Obligated Funding By Fiscal Year | DOL

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Spent Funding By Fiscal Year | DOL

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Award Table | DOL

U.S. agencies issue awards to implementing partners for the purpose of delivering foreign assistance abroad. These awards are the basis of the data available on this page. An award consists of individual financial transactions that agencies report to ForeignAssistance.gov each quarter. Award data includes quantitative information, like the aggregate amount of funding agencies have obligated or spent for particular activities, as well as qualitative information, like activity titles, descriptions, locations, and implementers.

The below table displays the foreign assistance awards agencies made, as reported by their accounting systems. Please note that this data represents aggregations of transaction-level information as reported by agencies, based on available fields at the time of reporting. Actual award totals may be higher if agencies have not yet reported transactions for certain years of a given award.

Click on the arrow next to an individual award to see additional details like links to strategies, evaluations, and budgets; select multiple awards and then tap the download button to unlock a customized dataset with detailed information on each transaction.

ForeignAssistance.gov publishes new data every two to three weeks. To see what we’re publishing, visit our What’s New page. For a primer on the kinds of data we offer, read our Understanding the Data page. And for everything else, consult our Frequently Asked Questions page.

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Frequently Asked Questions | DOL

What does the Department of Labor do?

The Department of Labor (DOL) fosters and promotes the welfare of the job seekers, wage earners, and retirees of the United States by improving their working conditions, advancing their opportunities for profitable employment, protecting their retirement and health care benefits, helping employers find workers, strengthening free collective bargaining, and tracking changes in employment, prices, and other national economic measurements. In carrying out this mission, the Department administers a variety of Federal labor laws including those that guarantee worker rights to safe and healthful working conditions; a minimum hourly wage and overtime pay; freedom from employment discrimination; unemployment insurance; and other income support.

What is ILAB?

The Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) carries out the international responsibilities of the Department of Labor under the direction of the Deputy Under Secretary for International Labor Affairs. ILAB conducts research on and formulates international economic, trade, immigration, and labor policies in collaboration with other U.S. government agencies and provides international technical assistance in support of U.S. foreign labor policy objectives. ILAB is working together with other U.S. government agencies to create a more stable, secure, and prosperous international economic system in which all workers can achieve greater economic security, share in the benefits of increased international trade, and have safer and healthier workplaces where the basic rights of workers and children are respected and protected.

What types of technical cooperation programming does ILAB provide?

ILAB implements technical cooperation projects under two broad programs.

ILAB’s Child Labor and Forced Labor program supports efforts to combat exploitative child labor and forced labor around the world. Technical cooperation projects range from targeted action programs in specific sectors of work to more comprehensive programs that support national efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor as defined by International Labour Organization (ILO) Convention 182.

ILAB’s Workers' Rights program provides technical assistance to countries on a variety of worker rights issues. Project goals include adopting or reforming labor laws or standards, improving labor inspectorates' enforcement capacity, increasing awareness of fundamental labor rights, and improving occupational safety and health conditions. ILAB also provides technical advice and other support to labor ministries through workshops and exchange programs.

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