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U.S. Department of Justice

Agency Overview

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Led by the Attorney General, the Department of Justice (DOJ or the Department) is comprised of approximately 40 components that have a broad array of national security, law enforcement, and criminal justice system responsibilities. DOJ prosecutes federal law offenders and represents the U.S. government in court; its attorneys represent the rights and interests of the American people and enforce federal criminal and civil laws, including antitrust, civil rights, environmental, and tax laws; its Immigration Judges ensure justice for immigrants in removal proceedings; its special agents investigate organized and violent crime, illegal drugs, gun and explosives violations; its deputy marshals protect the federal judiciary, apprehend fugitives and transport persons in federal custody; and its correctional officers confine convicted federal offenders. DOJ also provides grants and training to state, local, and tribal law enforcement partners and brings together national security, counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and foreign intelligence surveillance operations under a single authority.

DOJ has become a truly international agency, due to the rapidly evolving nature of transnational organized crime, terrorism, cybercrime, foreign corruption, and other cross-border issues. Terrorists and criminals respect no national boundaries, and DOJ has had to adapt accordingly. In addition to our operational activities and responsibilities, to assist our partners around the world, the Department works with foreign governments to develop professional and transparent law enforcement institutions that protect human rights, combat corruption, and reduce the threat of transnational crime and terrorism. The Department provides assistance through planning, advising, mentoring, capacity building, and partnering. In addition, the Department provides significant levels of training for our foreign counterparts, including training for foreign police agencies at the DEA and FBI training facilities in Quantico, Virginia, and providing training on-site in the host countries on a range of issues from intelligence analysis and counterterrorism investigations to white collar crime and organized crime.

The Department works in close partnership with the Department of State, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Department of Defense. These agencies provide funding for some of the Department’s programs.

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U.S. Department of Justice Data

U.S. government agencies report data quarterly to ForeignAssistance.gov to comply with the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2016 (FATAA). Each agency is required by FATAA to report data for FY2015 as the minimum base year, although some agencies have reported data prior to FY2015. Agency reporting completeness for FY2015 onward is captured below.

View our Agency Notes for additional information
Data Last Updated: 5/8/2020

Requested Funding By Fiscal Year |

This agency has no Requested data.

Appropriated Funding By Fiscal Year |

This agency has no Appropriated data.

Obligated Funding By Fiscal Year | DOJ

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Spent Funding By Fiscal Year | DOJ

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Award Table | DOJ

U.S. agencies issue awards to implementing partners for the purpose of delivering foreign assistance abroad. These awards are the basis of the data available on this page. An award consists of individual financial transactions that agencies report to ForeignAssistance.gov each quarter. Award data includes quantitative information, like the aggregate amount of funding agencies have obligated or spent for particular activities, as well as qualitative information, like activity titles, descriptions, locations, and implementers.

The below table displays the foreign assistance awards agencies made, as reported by their accounting systems. Please note that this data represents aggregations of transaction-level information as reported by agencies, based on available fields at the time of reporting. Actual award totals may be higher if agencies have not yet reported transactions for certain years of a given award.

Click on the arrow next to an individual award to see additional details like links to strategies, evaluations, and budgets; select multiple awards and then tap the download button to unlock a customized dataset with detailed information on each transaction.

ForeignAssistance.gov publishes new data every two to three weeks. To see what we’re publishing, visit our What’s New page. For a primer on the kinds of data we offer, read our Understanding the Data page. And for everything else, consult our Frequently Asked Questions page.

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Frequently Asked Questions | DOJ

What is the Department of Justice?

The mission of the Department of Justice (DOJ) is to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law; to ensure public safety against threats foreign and domestic; to provide federal leadership in preventing and controlling crime; to seek just punishment for those guilty of unlawful behavior; and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans.

When was the Department of Justice Created?

The Department of Justice, often referred to as the largest law office in the world, began in 1789 with a staff of two: the Attorney General and a clerk. The Judiciary Act of 1789 created the Office of the Attorney General, providing for the appointment of “a person, learned in the law, to act as attorney-general for the United States.” By 1870, the duties of the Office of the Attorney General had expanded so much that Congress adopted “An Act to establish the Department of Justice.” As its head, the Attorney General is the chief litigator and the chief law enforcement officer of the United States. Officially coming into existence on July 1, 1870, the Department of Justice was created to handle all criminal prosecutions and civil suits in which the United States had an interest.

What is the organizational structure of DOJ?

Led by the Attorney General, the Department of Justice (DOJ) is comprised of approximately 40 components that have a broad array of national security, law enforcement, and criminal justice system responsibilities. DOJ components include: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), INTERPOL Washington, National Security Division, Criminal Division, U.S. Marshals Service and U.S. Attorneys.

The Department is headquartered in Washington, DC, at the Robert F. Kennedy Building, occupying a city block bounded by 9th and 10th Streets and Pennsylvania and Constitution Avenues, NW. The Department also has field offices in all states and territories and maintains offices in over 100 countries worldwide.

What role does DOJ play in foreign assistance?

DOJ does not receive any appropriations specifically for foreign assistance However, DOJ does conduct a wide range of international activities in support of our mission, and a small portion of these can be considered as foreign assistance.

To assist our partners around the world, the Department works with foreign governments to develop professional and transparent law enforcement institutions that protect human rights, combat corruption, and reduce the threat of transnational crime and terrorism. The Department provides assistance through planning, advising, mentoring, capacity building, and partnering. In addition, the Department provides significant levels of training for our foreign counterparts including training for foreign police agencies at the DEA and FBI training facilities in Quantico, Virginia and providing training on-site in the host countries on a range of issues from intelligence analysis and counterterrorism investigations to white collar crime and organized crime.

DOJ works in close partnership with the Department of State, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Department of Defense, and the Millennium Challenge Corporation. These agencies provide funding for some of the Department’s programs.

What is the mission of Criminal Division’s International Criminal Investigative Training, Assistance Program (ICITAP)?

ICITAP works with foreign governments to develop professional and transparent law enforcement institutions that protect human rights, combat corruption, and reduce the threat of transnational crime and terrorism. ICITAP provides international development assistance that supports both national security and foreign policy objectives. ICITAP’s reach has grown over the years to encompass programs in approximately 30 countries across the globe.

What is the mission of Criminal Division’s Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance and Training (OPDAT)?

OPDAT assists prosecutors and judicial personnel in other countries to develop and sustain effective criminal justice institutions. OPDAT’s bilateral and multilateral assistance, including case-based mentoring, legislative advocacy, and skills development, fosters partner countries’ capacities to combat complex transnational crimes, including terrorism, money laundering and financial crimes, corruption, organized crime, cybercrime, intellectual property crime, trafficking in persons, and narco-trafficking.

What are the missions of INTERPOL Washington?

INTERPOL Washington, the United States National Central Bureau (USNCB), is the statutorily designated representative to the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) on behalf of the Attorney General. Its mission includes, but is not limited to, facilitating international police cooperation; transmitting information of a criminal justice, humanitarian and other law enforcement-related nature between U.S. law enforcement authorities and their foreign counterparts; and coordinating and integrating information in criminal investigations that serve to combat transnational crime and terrorism.

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