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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Agency Overview

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The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the U.S. government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS is headed by the Secretary who is the chief managing officer for the HHS family of agencies, including 11 operating divisions, 10 regional offices, as well as the Office of the Secretary.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) carries out the majority of the foreign assistance work at HHS in more than 50 countries worldwide and with over 300 CDC staff providing expertise in country. CDC leverages its core strengths to advance four overarching global health goals: 1) improving the health and well-being of people around the world, 2) improving capabilities for preparing for and responding to infectious diseases and emerging health threats, 3) building country public health capacity, and 4) maximizing organizational capacity.

CDC’s global programs are run by world leaders in epidemiology, surveillance, informatics, laboratory systems, and other essential disciplines. Through partnerships with other countries’ ministries of health, CDC is improving the quantity and quality of critical public health services. Currently, CDC’s global programs address over 400 diseases, health threats, and conditions that are major causes of death, disease, and disability. These programs provide a strong foundation for protecting Americans from major health threats, wherever they arise.

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Data

U.S. government agencies report data quarterly to ForeignAssistance.gov to comply with the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2016 (FATAA). Each agency is required by FATAA to report data for FY2015 as the minimum base year, although some agencies have reported data prior to FY2015. Agency reporting completeness for FY2015 onward is captured below.

Data Last Updated: 10/23/2020

Requested Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Appropriated Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Obligated Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Spent Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

The below figures show the amount of funding that was requested, appropriated, obligated, and spent for activities within a given year. These figures are interactive—choose your funding type and year of interest to learn more about which agencies programmed funds for which purposes. And after you've made your selection, scroll down and click the download button to view the resulting dataset.

Select from the timeline and data types to view additional details.

Award Table | HHS

U.S. agencies issue awards to implementing partners for the purpose of delivering foreign assistance abroad. These awards are the basis of the data available on this page. An award consists of individual financial transactions that agencies report to ForeignAssistance.gov each quarter. Award data includes quantitative information, like the aggregate amount of funding agencies have obligated or spent for particular activities, as well as qualitative information, like activity titles, descriptions, locations, and implementers.

The below table displays the foreign assistance awards agencies made, as reported by their accounting systems. Please note that this data represents aggregations of transaction-level information as reported by agencies, based on available fields at the time of reporting. Actual award totals may be higher if agencies have not yet reported transactions for certain years of a given award.

Click on the arrow next to an individual award to see additional details like links to strategies, evaluations, and budgets; select multiple awards and then tap the download button to unlock a customized dataset with detailed information on each transaction.

ForeignAssistance.gov publishes new data every two to three weeks. To see what we’re publishing, visit our What’s New page. For a primer on the kinds of data we offer, read our Understanding the Data page. And for everything else, consult our Frequently Asked Questions page.

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Start YearEnd YearAward TitleCountrySectorImplementerObligatedSpent

Frequently Asked Questions | HHS

What is HHS?

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS is headed by the Secretary who is the chief managing officer for our family of agencies, including 11 operating divisions, 10 regional offices, as well as the Office of the Secretary.

The mission of HHS is to help provide the building blocks that Americans need to live healthy, successful lives. We fulfill that mission every day by providing millions of children, families, and seniors with access to high-quality health care, by helping people find jobs and parents find affordable child care, by keeping the food on Americans’ shelves safe and infectious diseases at bay, and by pushing the boundaries of how we diagnose and treat disease.

What is the organizational structure of HHS?

HHS is composed of 11 operating divisions and offices within the Office of the Secretary. The 11 operating divisions are: the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Indian Health Services (IHS), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

What role does HHS play in foreign assistance?

HHS is primarily a domestic organization. With the growing interconnectedness throughout the world, HHS has begun to play more of a role in global health security and ensuring the safety of Americans. The CDC global health portfolio has expanded over the past decade with the start of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and CDC now has a presence in many countries. PEPFAR funding is not directly appropriated to HHS. HHS receives transfer from the State Department’s Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) to implement PEPFAR programs.

What are the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)?

CDC works to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.

CDC increases the health security of our nation. As the nation’s health protection agency, CDC saves lives and protects people from health threats. To accomplish our mission, CDC conducts critical science and provides health information that protects our nation against expensive and dangerous health threats, and responds when these arise.

How many CDC staff work in the field abroad?

More than 300 CDC staff work in more than 50 countries.

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