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ForeignAssistance.gov was updated on November 09, 2018. Click here to explore the update details.

Department of Health and Human Services

Agency Overview

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the U.S. government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS is headed by the Secretary who is the chief managing officer for the HHS family of agencies, including 11 operating divisions, 10 regional offices, as well as the Office of the Secretary.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) carries out the majority of the foreign assistance work at HHS in more than 50 countries worldwide and with over 300 CDC staff providing expertise in country. CDC leverages its core strengths to advance four overarching global health goals: 1) improving the health and well-being of people around the world, 2) improving capabilities for preparing for and responding to infectious diseases and emerging health threats, 3) building country public health capacity, and 4) maximizing organizational capacity.

CDC’s global programs are run by world leaders in epidemiology, surveillance, informatics, laboratory systems, and other essential disciplines. Through partnerships with other countries’ ministries of health, CDC is improving the quantity and quality of critical public health services. Currently, CDC’s global programs address over 400 diseases, health threats, and conditions that are major causes of death, disease, and disability. These programs provide a strong foundation for protecting Americans from major health threats, wherever they arise.

* All data provided will be updated and reported quarterly.

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Department of Health and Human Services Data

U.S. government agencies are adding data to ForeignAssistance.gov quarterly to comply with the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2016. Each agency is required by law to report at FY2015 as the minimum base year.

Planned Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

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Obligated Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

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Spent Funding By Fiscal Year | HHS

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Transaction Data | HHS

Transaction data represents every individual financial record in an agency’s accounting system for program work with implementing partners and administrative expenses. Transaction data is the most granular form of financial data. Each data record - or financial transaction - contains qualitative data fields, including descriptive titles, vendor names, and location, along with the financial data. Thus, transaction data is called Disaggregated data as it disaggregates financial data into its most basic form.

The data shown above in the planned, obligated, and spent tabs represents transaction data aggregated at a higher level of analysis (by country and sector only), thus this data is called Aggregated data.

The table below displays every applicable award within each agency’s accounting system. An award may consist of multiple financial transactions. In these instances, the table displays the award’s aggregated sum of its individual transactions. Data from the table can be downloaded by selecting each individual award. The downloadable report disaggregates award data into individual transactions. If an award has multiple transactions, the downloadable report will generate lines of data for each transaction.

For additional information related to data definitions and classifications, please refer to the Glossary of Terms or the FAQs.

This data set will continue to be updated in accordance with Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Bulletin 12-01.

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Frequently Asked Questions | HHS

What is HHS?

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government's principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS is headed by the Secretary who is the chief managing officer for our family of agencies, including 11 operating divisions, 10 regional offices, as well as the Office of the Secretary.

The mission of HHS is to help provide the building blocks that Americans need to live healthy, successful lives. We fulfill that mission every day by providing millions of children, families, and seniors with access to high-quality health care, by helping people find jobs and parents find affordable child care, by keeping the food on Americans’ shelves safe and infectious diseases at bay, and by pushing the boundaries of how we diagnose and treat disease.

What is the organizational structure of HHS?

HHS is composed of 11 operating divisions and offices within the Office of the Secretary. The 11 operating divisions are: the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the Administration for Community Living (ACL), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Indian Health Services (IHS), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

What role does HHS play in foreign assistance?

HHS is primarily a domestic organization. With the growing interconnectedness throughout the world, HHS has begun to play more of a role in global health security and ensuring the safety of Americans. The CDC global health portfolio has expanded over the past decade with the start of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and CDC now has a presence in many countries. PEPFAR funding is not directly appropriated to HHS. HHS receives transfer from the State Department’s Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) to implement PEPFAR programs.

What are the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)?

CDC works to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.

CDC increases the health security of our nation. As the nation’s health protection agency, CDC saves lives and protects people from health threats. To accomplish our mission, CDC conducts critical science and provides health information that protects our nation against expensive and dangerous health threats, and responds when these arise.

How many CDC staff work in the field abroad?

More than 300 CDC staff work in more than 50 countries.

Explore HHS Distributions on a Map